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Ontario Tech acknowledges the lands and people of the Mississaugas of Scugog Island First Nation.

We are thankful to be welcome on these lands in friendship. The lands we are situated on are covered by the Williams Treaties and are the traditional territory of the Mississaugas, a branch of the greater Anishinaabeg Nation, including Algonquin, Ojibway, Odawa and Pottawatomi. These lands remain home to many Indigenous nations and peoples.

We acknowledge this land out of respect for the Indigenous nations who have cared for Turtle Island, also called North America, from before the arrival of settler peoples until this day. Most importantly, we acknowledge that the history of these lands has been tainted by poor treatment and a lack of friendship with the First Nations who call them home.

This history is something we are all affected by because we are all treaty people in Canada. We all have a shared history to reflect on, and each of us is affected by this history in different ways. Our past defines our present, but if we move forward as friends and allies, then it does not have to define our future.

Learn more about Indigenous Education and Cultural Services

   
    Dec 03, 2020  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Academic Calendar 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Academic Calendar

Mechatronics Engineering


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General information


The Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science is one of a handful of universities in Canada that offers a dedicated program in Mechatronics Engineering. The program provides graduates with the knowledge and skills required to work in high-tech companies requiring the integration of electro-mechanical systems with controls and software, including robotics, automotive, consumer products, and aerospace industries, to name a few.

Developed in consultation with industry, the Mechatronics Engineering curriculum provides a solid grounding in the fundamentals of mathematics, computing and science, with significant content in engineering sciences and design. In addition to classroom lectures, students participate in tutorials, laboratories, computer simulations, field visits, independent research and design tasks, individual and group projects, as well as presentations to both technical and non-technical audiences. 

Complementary studies including liberal studies electives, collaborative leadership, economics, and ethics and law for professionals, promote a broader understanding of the needs of society and technology’s impact on it. Students gain technical expertise along with the understanding of business and humanities required for an integrated approach to mechatronics.

Admission requirements


Admission is competitive. The specific average or standing required for admission varies from year to year. Students are selected by taking into consideration a wide range of criteria including school marks, distribution of subjects taken, and performance in subjects relevant to the academic program. Possession of the minimum requirements does not guarantee acceptance. Preference will be given to applicants with the best qualifications.

Current Ontario secondary school students must complete the Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) with six 4U or 4M credits including English (ENG4U) with a minimum average of 60 per cent, Advanced Functions (MHF4U), Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U), Chemistry (SCH4U), and Physics (SPH4U). In addition, a combined minimum 70 per cent average in math and science courses is required, with no grade below 60 per cent. All other applicants should refer to admissions  for the requirements for their specific category of admission.

Work placement/internship/co-op opportunities


The university’s proximity to some of the largest automotive, electrical, manufacturing and software companies in Canada provides many opportunities for work placements. In addition, a 12- to 16-month optional Engineering Internship program is available for students completing third year, and students may participate in two- to four-month work placements through the Engineering Co-op program. See course descriptions for ENGR 0998U – Engineering Internship Program  and ENGR 0999U – Engineering Co-op Program  for details.

Professional designation


All of our undergraduate engineering programs in the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science have been fully accredited by the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board. Each graduate is eligible to apply for licensing as a professional engineer (PEng) in any province or territory in Canada.

Program details and degree requirements


To be eligible for an honours Bachelor of Engineering degree in Mechatronics Engineering, students must successfully complete 135 credit hours, including all courses outlined here. For elective options, see the following list.

All courses in Year 1, except SSCI 1470U , are prerequisites to all non-elective courses in Year 3.

All courses in Years 1 and 2, SSCI 1470U , are prerequisites to all non-elective courses in Year 4.

Approved students may undertake a co-op work term at any time before completing the program, and do so by registering in the course  ENGR 0999U – Engineering Co-op Program .

Although reasonable efforts will be made to adhere to the order and timing of courses as indicated, course requirements and term offerings may change. For the most up-to-date list of course offerings, please visit the faculty website at engineering.ontariotechu.ca

*Electives


Engineering electives

Courses selected for the Engineering elective must be approved by the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science. Engineering courses from other engineering programs may be allowed as Engineering electives provided students have the prerequisites and the courses extend the students’ knowledge through greater depth in an advanced area, or greater breadth in a complementary field. Not all of the listed Engineering electives will necessarily be offered each year.

The following are approved courses as Engineering electives:

Liberal Studies electives


Complementary studies, including courses in humanities, social sciences, arts, management, engineering economics, ethics and communication, are included in engineering programs to complement the technical content of the curriculum and thereby provide graduates with a broader perspective of their role in society. Inclusion of complementary studies also satisfies several accreditation criteria of the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board. Courses or parts of courses covering engineering economics, ethics, and the impact of technology on society, as well as courses that develop the student’s capability to communicate orally, visually and in writing, are essential to the education of an engineer and therefore are included in all of our engineering programs.

Liberal studies electives are included in each engineering program to ensure adequate coverage of subject matter that deals with central issues, methodologies and thought processes of the humanities and social sciences. Such material is required in the education of an engineer. Liberal studies electives can include, but are not limited to, courses dealing with cultural analysis; historical analysis; literature and the arts; knowledge, cognition, and moral reasoning; and social and behavioural analysis.

Foreign language and business courses may not be used as liberal studies. Courses can be approved as liberal studies electives for students in engineering programs at the university by the dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science (or designate), in accordance with these principles.

Courses selected for the liberal studies electives must be approved by the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science. Liberal studies electives are subject to change. An updated list of liberal studies electives will be maintained online at engineering.ontariotechu.ca.

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